My 1st 48 HRS OUT - Project thematic topics

Health Services in prison
Health Services in Prison
[more information coming soon]
Health Services outside prison
Health Services outside prison
[more information coming soon]

Overdose is one of the most serious challenging risk that people using drugs face. Especially after release from prison or hospitalisation they face an serious increased risk of overdosing. Naloxon is a safe antidote and highly effective intervention to an opioid overdose that can easily be administered by lay people.

The article "Power in a bottle: expanding Naloxon access" decribes various ways to increase the availability and access to the life saving medication Naloxon.

http://naloxoneinfo.org/sites/default/files/Power%20in%20a%20Bottle-Expanding%20Naloxone%20Access%20Though%20Various%20Settings_EN_0.pdf

 

There is limited research on overdosis and Naloxone interventions in prison settings. A good resource from the UK describing a randomised control pilot trial on Naloxone after release is from Mahesh Parmar et al, 2016.
The study adds research-based findings on the growing consensus that take-home Naloxon at prison release can prevent prevent overdose deaths and that the intervention is a significant opportunity to prevent overdose among PWID.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3795186/

 

6 video testimonials about personal experiences with naloxone in 6 EU countries: Denmark, Estonia, France, Italy, Lithuania and United Kingdom. The video are collected by EHRN in their programme I am the evidence on harm reduction and overdose prevention conducted in 2014.

http://www.harm-reduction.org/library/im-evidence-naloxone-works-6-videos-ehrn-2014 

“In July 2009, I started the Highland programme in Inverness, in the north of Scotland, to deliver overdose prevention services to those at risk of opiate overdose, their friends and family members, and staff working with those at risk. The program is part of the Scottish National Health Service....The programme also included Inverness prison; those who were identified as at risk were trained whilst in prison and given a naloxone pack on their liberation date….To date over 900 kits have been supplied and there have been over 200 recorded uses of naloxone with successful reversal of the overdose state. In 2012, the programme was developed to include supply of naloxone for intranasal administration….”
Lisa Ross, Scotland. 2013

See more: http://overdoseprevention.blogspot.hr/2013/02/ 

A usefull training manual is published by EHRN in 2014, The elalborte training manual written by Danny Morris and Gill Bradbury gives a broad overview of overdose prevention programming upon release in prison. The manual includes different modules and sessions that can be adjusted tot he local context. The comprehensive manual also includes templates, resources and PPT for the training.

http://www.harm-reduction.org/sites/default/files/pdf/od_prevention_management_manual.pdf