An Overview Of Drug Consumption Rooms

Mehmet Zülfü Öner (2014)

In response to growing concerns about the public health and public order problems related to drug use, countries use a comprehensive approach to the drug problem, which includes prevention, harm reduction, treatment, and enforcement. Harm reduction encompasses interventions, programmes and policies that seek to reduce the health, social and economic harms of drug use to individuals, communities and societies. Drug consumption rooms are an example of a harm reduction programme and are a component of some drug strategies in some countries.
Drug consumption rooms (DCRs) are legally sanctioned public health facilities that offer a hygienic environment where people can use drugs under the supervision of trained staff. The overall rationale for consumption rooms is to reach and address the problems of specific, high-risk populations of drug users, especially injectors and those who consume in public. Drug consumption rooms aim to reduce the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, in particular HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and hepatitis; to reduce the likelihood of illness and death resulting from overdose; and to help people who use drugs avoid other harms associated with drug consumption under unhygienic or unsafe conditions.
This article looks at the experiences with drug consumption rooms describes the general features and analyzes them from a historical point of view. This article also explores the position of these rooms in international law.

An Overview Of Drug Consumption Rooms

An Overview Of Drug Consumption Rooms (463)

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